About

Artifice is a nonprofit literary publisher devoted to prose and poetry “aware of its own artifice.”

We’re a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, and are not connected to any institution or university. Which means we depend on folks like you to help us keep going. Why not buy an issue of our magazine, or even make a tax deductible donation? All donations made to Artifice Magazine are tax-deductible to the full extent of the law.

For information about distribution, please email editors AT artificemag DOT com

The things we like, we like more than we can stand.

Visit us at our other home, Artifice Books.

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Our Bloggers:

Jenn Frank is a former video games critic and ex-celebrity gossip blogger who now writes overblown works of creative nonfiction. Her work has appeared at Unwinnable, Motherboard, Kotaku, Jezebel, and Wired, and in two issues of Kill Screen Magazine.

Additionally, she blogs for funsies at both Infinite Lives and the Temper, Temper. She graduated from Northwestern University eight years ago with a degree in fiction writing. She believes in generosity, human goodness, the Chicago Manual of Style, and puns. She also collects action figures, reads comic books, and is a 12-year-old boy. Find her on Twitter!

Russ Woods is a librarian and poetry editor/web designer for Red Lightbulbs and Love Symbol Press. He also writes poems and has a list of publications at solarflareshavebeenknowntocauseheartache.com. He has been in bands like Pretty Swans and Tinyfolk and Forever Wolf. He sometimes raps as Young Shade. He lives in Chicago. His favorite band is Destroyer. His favorite rapper is E-40. His favorite graphic novel is Big Questions by Anders Nilsen. His favorite book of poetry is Scary No Scary by Zachary Schomburg. His favorite directors are Ethan & Joel Coen. His favorite type of nature is the beach.

Meghan Lamb lives and writes on the south side of Chicago with her husband, dog, and cat. She co-edits the magazine Red Lightbulbs. Her novella, Silk Flowers, is forthcoming from Aqueous Books in July 2013. By day, she works as a training counselor for adults with special needs. By night, she spirals through a fuckwave of sex, booze, and self-destruction.

Mason Johnson didn’t really see his dad until he was about ten because Mason’s dad was often on tour with bands like AC/DC and Menudo. If given the chance, Mason would make the same choices of his father, and his father before him. Oh yeah, Mason also writes for CBS Chicago’s local news websites.

Julia Vodrey Hendrickson is a visual artist, writer, and curator. A freelance art critic for Printeresting and Art In Print, she has published a collection of poetry called Grow No Moss (printed at Spudnik Press, Chicago, 2011). Julia is currently in London studying art history at the Courtauld Institute of Art with a focus on French modernism, and is writing a thesis on the gendered histories of wallpaper and the evolution of the white wall. She is scheming to adopt a small, Chicago-style dog in the future.

Matt Rowan is a writer of things. He lives in Chicago, which is a good place for living. He works just outside of Chicago, as an educator. In Chicago, he has an apartment and in it he dwells with his wonderfully awesome girlfriend and dogs so small you are sure to think they are not dogs but rather dogs of alien world where everything is miniature and some things are made of glass. It is a fragile world, so smaller dogs aren’t at such a disadvantage there. Aside from that, he has a blog of his own that goes painfully long stretches without update, but that’s ok because it’s just for fun. You can view it at literaryequations.blogspot.com. He’s also editor of Untoward Magazine, which specializes in humor but loves lots of written things. He’s helped out with NAP chapbook selection, and he has a forthcoming story collection, Why God Why, being published by Love Symbol Press later this year. He exists on Facebook where you can find him a lot. He also has some stories in or soon to be in elimae, NANO Fiction, Curbside Splendor, Prick of the Spindle, Necessary Fiction and elsewhere. He thanks you for your time.

Alexander J. Allison spends every third Tuesday delivering parcels of words to the elderly, infirmed and lonely. His hope is to matter. The Prodigal will be published by Civil Coping Mechanisms in January 2013.

Additional content by James Tadd Adcox and Kaisa Cummings.

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